Truchet Tiles Cushion

Last fall I attended a workshop led by Betty Calvert about rug designing with Truchet tiles. This cushion is the outcome of that workshop, and was designed by Betty. I love the design, and I’m thrilled with the colour combo. Green and purple together are always pleasing to my eye.

In the late 1600’s, Sebastien Truchet, a French Dominican monk, observed that tiles based on a square split in half diagonally could be combined to form different patterns depending on their layout. This is different from tiles that have a central motif; when combined, those tiles will just yield a repeated motif. This is really interesting for quilters: when you think of the half-square triangle and the many combinations and orientations that result in a huge number of possible patterns, especially when you add colour to the mix.

If you Google “Truchet Tiles” there are actually websites that allow you to play with half-square triangle layouts. I’m going to try this for my next HST based quilting project.

It was great to get out and spend the day hooking and learning, and also fun to hook Betty’s design with a smaller strip than I usually work with, which makes finer detail possible.

 

Canola Field: Hooked Rug Version

I really enjoyed hooking the simple colour scheme in creating this piece, and am particularly happy with the contrast between flowers and sky. I wanted to convey the light fluffy flower tops that you can see the sky behind, I wanted to portray the energy of the approaching thunderstorm, and I wanted to evoke an overall feeling of lush abundance. The trickiest part was suggesting the plant stalks: vertical, but not completely straight. I don’t feel that the design challenge is completely exhausted: I may want to do another rug on the subject, but more abstract.

This small rug will be used as a coaster or pad for hot objects. It was hooked using #6 cut wool strips.

 

Lake Huron Study

This is my latest rug hooking piece, titled “Lake Huron Study”. The piece measures 16″ by 25″, and will be used as a large table protector for placing hot or cold items.

For years I’ve been drawn to trying to capture the beauty of the view from the Lake Huron shore, and I find that rug hooking is wonderful way to do that, as the techniques are so simple, and it’s easy to blend colours and textures to create just the right effect.

I recently joined the Burlington Hooking Craft Guild, and that was a great move! The in-studio time helped me get this project completed, and the studio itself – located at the Art Gallery of Burlington – has a lot to offer, including a small supply shop, a huge kitchen with full dyeing equipment, a lending library, and an assortment of strip cutters.

What’s also great is the camaraderie of working alongside other dedicated and knowledgeable hookers.

The supplies for Lake Huron Study were purchased at Martina Lesar’s studio in Caledon. The abstract design is my own.