Canola Field: Hooked Rug Version

I really enjoyed hooking the simple colour scheme in creating this piece, and am particularly happy with the contrast between flowers and sky. I wanted to convey the light fluffy flower tops that you can see the sky behind, I wanted to portray the energy of the approaching thunderstorm, and I wanted to evoke an overall feeling of lush abundance. The trickiest part was suggesting the plant stalks: vertical, but not completely straight. I don’t feel that the design challenge is completely exhausted: I may want to do another rug on the subject, but more abstract.

This small rug will be used as a coaster or pad for hot objects. It was hooked using #6 cut wool strips.

 

Route 66 Socks

These socks were nice to knit. Once again the pattern is from Stephanie Van Der Linden’s Around the World in Knitted Socks, may favourite book. These are now a belated birthday present for my brother.

I have learned to knit holding the different colours of yarn in each hand, so with this pattern there is never a need to twist (or untwist) the yarn. The only potential pitfall I can see in this pattern is on the sole. Because the sole is evenly striped, it’s easy to get ridges and bumps from the colour switch. You need to be careful of the tension of the yarn that’s being carried – not to let it get too tight.

Next up: Herringbone socks from the same book.

Canola Field: Embroidered Version

This is my first attempt at translating my canola vision into fibre art. I am a member of the Guelph Embroiderers Guild, and took a class there on miniature landscapes. This is created entirely using straight stitches and French knots with embroidery floss on linen.

I am currently finishing up my rug hooking version of the canola field scene, and thinking of getting bolder and less representative with the quilted and woven versions.

Design Challenge

A couple of summers ago I came across this magnificent canola field near the Lake Huron shore. The photograph doesn’t do the scene justice, because what you can’t see is the thunderstorm brewing overhead, and of course you can’t feel the heat and humidity of the summer day.

The scene I saw that day has been inspiring me ever since, and I’ve decided to do a design challenge: to translate the canola field experience into all forms of fibre art that I can.

Over the coming weeks I’m looking forward to showing you canola inspired embroidery, rug hooking, quilting, weaving, and possibly knitting.

If you’re interested, why not join me in this challenge?

The Big Pineapple

The Big Pineapple pattern is from the book Material Obsession by Kathy Doughty and Sarah Fielke. I am always on the lookout for patterns that will show off my large prints, and that is what attracted me to this one. I used a very similar colour scheme to the one pictured in the book, in order to get the idea. Because the blocks are so big (26 1/2″), it was relatively easy to piece, though there were some tricky corners. I’d like to do this again, on a smaller scale for a baby quilt, in a lower contrast fabric grouping. As the pattern produces a perfect square, I think it would lend itself to a baby or picnic quilt.

This quilt was long-arm quilted with an overall flower and leaf design by Anne Freidrich. I am particularly happy with the sashing and border of Basic Grey Moda Grunge in aqua.

The Big Pineapple was sitting unfinished for a year or so, just because of the binding. I am almost through my UFO pile, but having new quilt ideas every day.

French Braid Quilt

This French braid quilt was done in browns and golds using various small prints and solids in a graded colour sequence. I’d like to try this pattern again in brightly coloured batiks to see the difference. This UFO has been sitting waiting for binding for a couple of years. It feels good to finally finish it off and make it useable. Plus I am getting closer to starting some new quilting projects – only a few UFOs are left.

If you would like to duplicate this quilt, it was done using 2 1/2 inch by 9 inch strips in descending/ascending colour sequence, and 2 1/2 inch accent squares. The offset centre squares are 8 inches, and the gold sashing strips are 3 inches wide. The assembly was quite simple; the accent squares line up perfectly without special effort. As always, I measured the strip lengths before cutting and sewing the sashing strips and border strips to fit. (Otherwise you’ll end up with a less than flat quilt top.)

This quilt was long-arm quilted by Robin Petty using an all-over pattern of oak leaves, which seemed fitting for the fall palette.

Traditional Stitch Motifs

Well I am back on track after March break.

This is another pattern from Stephanie Van Der Linden’s “Around the World in Knitted Socks.” They were easy to knit, though I did get a bit confused by the gusset pattern, and there were about 25 threads on each sock to weave in. I love the braid at the top and the three colour combination. They are a perfect fit, so I will keep them for my self – on to the next!

Next on the agenda are the Route 66 socks from the same book. My brother admired them, and he has a big birthday coming up.