Canola Field: Hooked Rug Version

I really enjoyed hooking the simple colour scheme in creating this piece, and am particularly happy with the contrast between flowers and sky. I wanted to convey the light fluffy flower tops that you can see the sky behind, I wanted to portray the energy of the approaching thunderstorm, and I wanted to evoke an overall feeling of lush abundance. The trickiest part was suggesting the plant stalks: vertical, but not completely straight. I don’t feel that the design challenge is completely exhausted: I may want to do another rug on the subject, but more abstract.

This small rug will be used as a coaster or pad for hot objects. It was hooked using #6 cut wool strips.

 

Shiny Things

It’s been a very busy week (March Break), but I did manage to finish my rug hooking, which I am calling “Shiny Things”. I’m going to sew it into a tote bag – a future post.

Shiny Things seemed like an appropriate name since the crow has found something interesting and shiny, and the tote bag will be for shopping. The tote bag idea came from one of the women at the Burlington Hooking Crafts Guild (thanks Patty!) Once I saw her fabulous bag, I knew I had to make one too.

This is my own design, and the first in a series of crow themed rug hookings. The simple colour scheme pleases me, and the variation in reds in the background give it some interest and texture. It’s wool on linen, about 14″ by 19″.

Lake Huron Study

This is my latest rug hooking piece, titled “Lake Huron Study”. The piece measures 16″ by 25″, and will be used as a large table protector for placing hot or cold items.

For years I’ve been drawn to trying to capture the beauty of the view from the Lake Huron shore, and I find that rug hooking is wonderful way to do that, as the techniques are so simple, and it’s easy to blend colours and textures to create just the right effect.

I recently joined the Burlington Hooking Craft Guild, and that was a great move! The in-studio time helped me get this project completed, and the studio itself – located at the Art Gallery of Burlington – has a lot to offer, including a small supply shop, a huge kitchen with full dyeing equipment, a lending library, and an assortment of strip cutters.

What’s also great is the camaraderie of working alongside other dedicated and knowledgeable hookers.

The supplies for Lake Huron Study were purchased at Martina Lesar’s studio in Caledon. The abstract design is my own.