Flying Geese and Feathers

I’m still working with that rainbow assortment of fabrics! This time I wanted to try the rainbow progression of flying geese with an off white background. I just love the clean look that resulted.

The quilt top was incredibly quick and easy to assemble, with just one column of 21 flying geese, and several large strips of varying off-whites. Once completed I realized the large expanses of off-white would be difficult to quilt, with no blocks for reference. So I took it to Sew Etc. in Burlington, where I could rent a longarm machine, and also get a great deal of help, in long arm quilting it myself. (Thanks Jane!)

Don’t you just love the feather design? It goes beautifully with the geese, and adds a gorgeous texture to the final product. I used a higher loft batting, along with this fairly dense quilting design, to enhance the texture since the quilt itself is so plain.

The binding is scrappy – a mix of the off whites from the top.

I think for my next quilting project, I’ll put aside the rainbow fabrics and work on something a little different. I have two ideas in mind: a kantha baby blanket made from cotton double gauze, and a low contrast quilt using half-square triangles where half of each triangle is an off white, and the other half a low-contrast coordinating gentle print.

Crosswalk

My inspiration for this quilt design was a photograph of Shibuya Crossing (the world’s busiest intersection) in the rain. Initially, I planned to put the crosswalk strips on an angle, but when I laid out the actual strips, it just didn’t look good, so ended up setting them straight.

You may recognize the colourful fabric strips from some of my other quilt designs. Isn’t it a fabulous, bright mix? This fabric selection just keeps on giving; I still have a big stack to use in another project.

I used 9 by 2 inch strips of my rainbow selection, interspersed with off-white. I think a scrappy mix of off-whites would also look great in this design, and definitely a black or grey background would look great.

I quilted it first with the large divided circles which are meant to represent umbrellas, then filled in between the umbrellas with small circles to represent rain. Overall, I like the resulting texture.

I have a great idea for another Crosswalk quilt. The strips and background would look like the album cover for Abbey Road, then outlines of John, Paul, George and Ringo could be quilted on. Wouldn’t that be fun? Maybe next time.

Truchet Tiles Cushion

Last fall I attended a workshop led by Betty Calvert about rug designing with Truchet tiles. This cushion is the outcome of that workshop, and was designed by Betty. I love the design, and I’m thrilled with the colour combo. Green and purple together are always pleasing to my eye.

In the late 1600’s, Sebastien Truchet, a French Dominican monk, observed that tiles based on a square split in half diagonally could be combined to form different patterns depending on their layout. This is different from tiles that have a central motif; when combined, those tiles will just yield a repeated motif. This is really interesting for quilters: when you think of the half-square triangle and the many combinations and orientations that result in a huge number of possible patterns, especially when you add colour to the mix.

If you Google “Truchet Tiles” there are actually websites that allow you to play with half-square triangle layouts. I’m going to try this for my next HST based quilting project.

It was great to get out and spend the day hooking and learning, and also fun to hook Betty’s design with a smaller strip than I usually work with, which makes finer detail possible.

 

Design Challenge: The Four Elements

The last challenge was so much fun, we decided to start another one.

This is another quilting challenge, but with much more creative license. The challenge is to create a quilt that portrays the four elements (earth, water, air, fire).

After some brainstorming, I remembered my extensive collection of Asian fabric panels. This could be a great opportunity to use several of them, with some framing, and maybe a piano key border. The quilting on each panel could be reflective of the element represented.

Can’t wait to get started!

Linen Basket

Happy New Year!

I decided to go ahead with a small improvement to the bathroom: a basket to neatly stash soiled handtowels awaiting laundry day.

The resulting basket is a repurposed doll quilt, in response to my quilt-cutting challenge. Very little cutting was necessary; it was mostly folding, like origami, and sewing into place. I used to love making origami boxes when I was a kid, so this was entertaining and easy. It’s great how it stands up on its own without collapsing, and its bottom is pleasingly flat. It’s also handy that it can be tossed in the wash along with its contents. I’d like to experiment with Velcro for a less permanent basket.

I haven’t finished with the quilt-cutting challenge yet; I dug out a large quilt that I never use, and am planning to make a couple of quilted bags from it.

If you are taking up this challenge, I would love to see your pictures.

Design Challenge: cutting a quilt

Although we are still in the midst of the Colourburst challenge, my mother and I had a meeting recently and decided on a second quilt challenge.

The challenge is to transform a quilt, through cutting and sewing, into a different useful object; for instance a piece of clothing, a bag, or an upholstered item.

This is pretty exciting, what’s coming immediately to my mind is folding the quilted fabric so that it becomes a freestanding article. I suspect my mother is planning a quilted jacket.  I’ll have to do something outstanding to compete with Mom, and I also want to keep my plans secret before the unveiling.

The two of us didn’t set a deadline, but I propose February 28, 2018. If anyone has some good ideas, or would like to join in the challenge, let me know. I’ll post pictures at the beginning of March.

Breadcrumbs

I wanted to design a hooked rug with a realistic looking bird. My daughter suggested a pigeon, and it was a great choice because they are such distinctive colourful birds with their own attitude. I wanted to somehow represent breadcrumbs that the bird would like to eat, but worried small flecks would disappear in the saturated background. That’s why I went with the border of circles, using colours from the pigeon in random order.

Isn’t it funny that pigeons have red eyes? They also have large pink or orange feet, but I used some artistic license.

Anyway, the rug is mat size – 19 x 25 inches, but I’m not sure I can bear to use it as a rug considering the number of hours that went into hooking it. I may want to hook a seagull next.